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Cooking oil, holiday lights can be recycled

Madison residents can recycle cooking oil used on Thanksgiving and holiday lights and extension cords that might be coming out of storage in the coming weeks.

Residents who want to recycle cooking oil are asked to take the oil to collection tanks at one of two drop-off sites at 1501 W. Badger Rd. and 4602 Sycamore Ave. It should not be taken to waste oil sites.

The oil can be turned into fuel for cars and trucks.

Old or broken holiday lights can also be taken to the drop-off sites and be put into special containers. The bulbs should be removed from strings of lights with the large bulbs. Bulbs do not need to be removed from strings of mini lights.

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Madison police question benefits of body cameras

As a growing number of police departments nationwide equip officers with body-worn cameras, Madison police are issuing a report that questions some benefits of the devices.

Police plan to present the report to the Madison City Council on Tuesday, the Wisconsin State Journal reported.

The report notes that studies have shown departments that use the cameras have seen fewer citizen complaints. But it also said more research is needed to see if the cameras actually bolster trust in officers.

Capt. Kristen Roman said the report examined the pros, cons and costs of body cameras. She said officers are not taking a position on whether to support their use or not.

Some Madison officers will start wearing body cameras in 2016 as part of a pilot program.

Untreated wastewater discharges into low-lying areas on north side

Untreated wastewater discharges into low-lying areas on north side

Approximately 500,000 gallons of untreated wastewater was intermittently discharged over a 25-hour period on Madison's north side last week, according to a release.

The Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District said during the relining of one of its interceptor sewers near Golf Parkway, officials said.

During the relining, untreated wastewater was diverted around the relining area, according to the release. MMSD's contractor had three pumps on site to divert the wastewater, which included two back-up pumps.

On Nov. 16, the primary pump and the two backup pumps failed, officials said. When the pumps failed, a temporary discharge of wastewater went to nearby low-lying areas and ditches.

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources was notified of the spill, according to the release.

Officials said the pump failure has been corrected, and appropriate remedial actions have been taken.

Goodman Community Center able to meet Thanksgiving goal

Goodman Community Center able to meet Thanksgiving goal

After concerns over being able to provide a Thanksgiving meal for 3,000 area families in need, the Goodman Community Center's executive director is happy to credit the community for helping them meet their goal.

"Today is great news," Becky Steinhoff said. "We provided to all 3,000 families who were on our list."

Even late last week, the Goodman Community Center's Fritz Food Pantry only had 2,100 turkeys. Thanks to the generosity of neighbors, more than 1,000 turkeys were donated over the last few days.

"It's probably 15,000-20,000 people who'll eat this Thanksgiving thanks to the generosity of our community. That's a lot of people," Steinhoff said.

With more than 100 extra turkeys, the Fritz Food Pantry has been able to also provide anyone who called-in or walked-in part of their meal.

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23 new Madison restaurants you'll love

Each year brings with it a swath of new eateries, and with new eateries comes excitement. We love what?s fresh and untested but also untainted. Sure, some are more hyped than others (we?re looking at you, Sujeo, Cento, Rare and the Edgewater), but even the low-key taco joints and quaint caf�s offer intrigue?maybe this is the place we?ve been waiting for. Whether it?s a go-to date night spot, an equal parts convenient and tasty takeout joint on the way home from work or the perfect neighborhood bar, the following twenty-three places offer something in the way of excitement, many for more reasons than one, and we couldn?t be happier to welcome them to town.

KEY
$ <$10
$$ $10?$15
$$$ $15?$25
$$$$ $25+
(price indicates cost of a dinner entr�e)




Water Utility Board delays rate increase decision

Wanting consultants to show greater detail on how a water rate increase would impact more Madison customers, the Madison Water Utility Board delayed a decision Tuesday on whether or not to send a requested rate increase to the Public Service Commission.

Water Utility officials said the increase is needed to pay for infrastructure improvements, like replacing water mains.

Based on the latest consultant presentation, if the current proposal is eventually approved, it would add about $40 per year, or $3.24 per month, to the average residential bill.

The proposal also includes what is called a conservation rate, recommending if residents use less than 6,000 gallons every month between June and September, their bills would be reduced by 20 percent.

However, for large water users, that would mean paying a much higher bill. Some board members equated that to a penalty fee.

Organization takes on racial disparities in incarceration

Organization takes on racial disparities in incarceration

The Wisconsin Council on Children and Families' “Race to Equity” report indicates that Wisconsin, and particularly Dane County, may have the worst racial disparities in incarceration in the nation. MOSES, a Madison-based interfaith social justice organization, is working to fix that.

In fact, it may go even farther than that. Amy Pooler, a leader in MOSES, said, “Dane County has the worst racial disparities in incarceration rates of African American rates in the country, and that means in the world, because the U.S. already incarcerates more of its population than any other nation on Earth.”