Our network

Health

Untreated wastewater discharges into low-lying areas on north side

Untreated wastewater discharges into low-lying areas on north side

Approximately 500,000 gallons of untreated wastewater was intermittently discharged over a 25-hour period on Madison's north side last week, according to a release.

The Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District said during the relining of one of its interceptor sewers near Golf Parkway, officials said.

During the relining, untreated wastewater was diverted around the relining area, according to the release. MMSD's contractor had three pumps on site to divert the wastewater, which included two back-up pumps.

On Nov. 16, the primary pump and the two backup pumps failed, officials said. When the pumps failed, a temporary discharge of wastewater went to nearby low-lying areas and ditches.

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources was notified of the spill, according to the release.

Officials said the pump failure has been corrected, and appropriate remedial actions have been taken.

City to keep adding flouride to water supply

City to keep adding flouride to water supply

The Madison Water Utility Board said this week that it would continue to add fluoride to the city's drinking water.

The utility board voted at its meeting Tuesday night to keep its fluoride policy. The city's been adding fluoride to water to improve dental health for 68 years since the policy was adopted in 1946.

Madison Water Utility currently aims for a target fluoride concentration of 0.7 parts per million, as recommended by county, national and international health agencies.

In a news release Wednesday, the city of Madison said it took public comments on the policy Tuesday for about two hours before the vote.

The policy will be reviewed again in 2024.

RELATED: Utility to review adding fluoride to Madison water

Hundreds receive free medical care in Madison

Hundreds receive free medical care in Madison

It's a clinic like no other, and it was hosted in Madison Saturday. The free health care clinic provided hundreds of uninsured residents with medication and other necessary medical care that they might not normally be able to get.

"It's very scary that you have health issues, but don't have the money or resources to get the help that you need," patient Silvana Mercedes said.

Mercedes has been living without health insurance for seven years. As a diabetic she said the free clinic stirred up unexpected emotions.

"I cried. I gave the doctors hugs because it was that much of a relief for me, knowing that I'm going to be able to have a supply of medication," she said.

Madison No. 8 on list of happiest, healthiest cities in U.S.

Madison No. 8 on list of happiest, healthiest cities in U.S.

A health and wellness website has listed Madison as one of the top 25 happiest and healthiest cities in the country.

Prevention.com evaluated 100 of the nation?s largest cities on 48 measures of health, happiness and well-being to compile the list, according to the article. Some of the things they looked at include access to green space, access to concert halls, number of farmers? markets, the average inclination to eat fruits and vegetables, disease incident, depression measures, unemployment rates and FBI crime statistic.

Madison was ranked eight on the list of 25 behind San Francisco, Fargo, San Diego, Anaheim, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Salt Lake City and San Jose.

FEED Kitchens Information Sessions

The FEED Kitchens Center celebrates diverse communities of “doers” eager to bring new products to market or expand their current businesses, but with limited access to a commercial kitchen, according to a report. Their mission is to create an enterprise that supports local food entrepreneurs and the development of food-related employment by providing five commercial kitchen spaces for food processing. Their goal is to increase availability of local, healthy and affordable food in the greater Madison & Dane County areas.

The FEED kitchen has recently opened. They are holding  sessions to learn more about how to become a user of the Kitchens.  All sessions are held at FEED, 1213 N. Sherman Avenue. Email feedmanager@northsidemadison.org or call 204-7015 for more information.

Saturday, July 26:  2 – 3:30 pm

Tuesday, July 29:  6 – 7:30 pm

Saturday, August 23:  2 – 3:30 pm

Toxic algae spotted on Lake Mendota

Toxic algae spotted on Lake Mendota

Toxic algae were spotted on Lake Mendota near the University of Wisconsin campus and in Lake Waubesa, according to a release from UW officials.

Officials said cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae blooms, were spotted Tuesday in the area of Memorial Union and Hoofers.

The public is urged to avoid contact with the algae and not swim at night when the blooms can?t be seen.

The algae blooms occur when there is little wind and hot temperatures combined with lake nutrients.

Symptoms of a reaction to algae blooms include eye, throat, nose or skin irritation, and vomiting or diarrhea. These symptoms can happen between several hours and a few days after being exposed.

Mosquito season off to an annoying start

Mosquito season off to an annoying start

Mosquito season is off to an annoying start in northern Wisconsin, where the problem has been so bad that one canoeing company has been turning away customers rather than sending them out on a bug-infested river.

Fortunately, though, the rest of the summer might not be so bad. A Madison entomologist said early indications suggest this season may end up being no worse than usual, and that standard precautions might be enough to keep the pesky critters away.

Some hardware stores up north have been having trouble keeping bug repellent on the shelves, and some residents said they can't remember a summer with such abundant swarms.

PJ Liesch, who studies insects at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, was in northern Wisconsin over Memorial Day weekend. That Friday and Saturday were pleasantly mosquito-free, but hordes of the blood-sucking pests appeared as if out of nowhere that Sunday, he said.