Our network

People

5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche

Stage Q is proud to present 5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche written by Evan Linder and Andrew Hobgood at the Bartell Theatre, 113 E. Mifflin Street in downtown Madison, from March 28th to April 12th, 2014.  Directed by Jan Levine Thal, 5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche is a comedy with a twist and a “frolicsome little play that ventures into heady excesses of absurdism” (NY Times).

 

A dark comedy set in 1956 amid the threat of nuclear war, this play harpoons many of the mid-century myths and assumptions that pushed lesbians into the closet or into the kitchen to bake quiche.

 

Performances run from March 28 thru April 12 and tickets are available at www.stageq.com and are $15 for Thursday, $20 Friday and Saturday and $10 for Sunday.

 

Org seeks families for Habitat homes; meetings scheduled in April

Habitat for Humanity of Dane County will hold two meetings in April for families interested in partnering with the organization to become homeowners.

A meeting is scheduled at 2 p.m. on April 6 at Warner Park Community Recreation Center, 1625 Northport Dr. in Madison.

A second meeting will be held April 8 at 6 p.m. at the Colonial Club, 301 Blankenheim Lane in Sun Prairie.

HHDC acquired 29 family unit lots in Sun Prairie earlier this year and is currently seeking local families to participate.

The homes will be built in the Uplands and Vandenburg Heights neighborhoods, according to the Sun Prairie Star... Read More

Love of antique Valentines fuels card collector

Love of antique Valentines fuels card collector

Mid-February is an especially lovable time of year at one north side Madison home.

It's the time of year Sandy Hogar unboxes her extensive collection of antique Valentine's Day cards and displays the intricate, yet mostly pristine paper Valentines in her house. 

Hogar, who's been collecting the cards for more than 30 years, said many of the Valentines cards feature modes of transportation like trains, cars and boats. There are also plenty of animals, including many dogs. 

Some of the cards date back to the 1880s. A 103-year-old Valentine in Hogar's collection, which features a boy and girl cherub on a blue carriage with lots of flowers, is in perfect condition. 

"To think that they've survived all these years, that's what's so neat about them," Hogar said. 

Winter season ripe for snowshoeing at area parks

Winter season ripe for snowshoeing at area parks

If Madison area residents are looking for a cabin fever cure, area parks offer various trails for a fun snow activity.

Madison Parks spokeswoman Laura Whitmore said snowshoeing is a great way to get outdoors in Wisconsin's winter months and experience the Madison area parks. 

In addition to Edna Taylor Conservation Park, snowshoe trails are offered at Cherokee Marsh Mendota and North units, Elvehjem Park, Garner Park, Heritage Prairie, Heritage Sanctuary, Hoyt Park, Knollwood Conservation Park, Mineral Point Park, Prairie Ridge Conservation Park, Sandburg Woods, Walnut Grove Park and Warner Park. 

More information is available online at cityofmadison.com/parks/snowshoeing.

Watch News 3's Mary Jo Ola tackle the winter activity at Edna Taylor Conservation Park:

Madison Utilities: Make sure your pipes are protected

Madison Utilities: Make sure your pipes are protected

Madison Water Utility officials are hoping a few quick tips will help residents avoid costly -- and dangerous pipe bursting accidents during the extreme cold.

According to a release, MWU has initiated emergency water shut-offs at six unoccupied homes because of burst pipes. But, officials say there are a few simple steps customers can take.

  • If you have heating tape around pipes, make sure it's plugged in.
  • Double-check that outdoor spigots are off and all hoses are disconnected.
  • Insulate pipes in unheated areas.
  • Leave some heat on in unused areas of the home.
  • Keep the thermostat on at least 55 degrees if you're going out of town
  • If leaving town for extended period of time, have pipes winterized.

According to the release, all family members and household residents should know where the main water shut-off valve in the home is in case of a burst pipe.

Scope of hunger in Dane County is getting worse

Scope of hunger in Dane County is getting worse

Vincent Washington took his place in line outside of the Bread of Life Food Pantry. It's certainly not his first time at St. Paul's. He and his wife used to volunteer there, until the temp jobs ran out, along with the food in his kitchen.

Now unemployed, Washington said coming to the pantry once a month is about survival.

"Without it, what are you going to do? Go out there and steal and rob, and then where would you be?" Washington said.

Teriann Strassi will also have Thanksgiving dinner thanks to Bread of Life. She started coming in 2010 after her job was shipped overseas and her unemployment benefits ran out.

A mother of three, Strassi is working toward her paralegal degree. Since her husband works full time, the family doesn't qualify for food stamps or other government help when it comes to food.

"There have been plenty of tears. Plenty of days when I feel like I can't make it," Strassi said. "Tomorrow's always better."

County, city discuss possible day shelter for homeless

County, city discuss possible day shelter for homeless

Dane County could make a deal on a new permanent day shelter for the homeless in the next couple of weeks.

Officials said the push for finding a place for the homeless is because there are so many people still trying to get on their feet after the recession.

The ideal location would be in the immediate downtown area so the homeless can have quick access to services to help them get jobs and get back on their feet. But as the real estate market bounces back, properties that fit the county's needs and fit into the $600,000 budget have been scarce.

As a result, their focus has turned to properties some distance from the city center, like the MARC East building on Lien Road.

"Part of the answer is that the homeless are everywhere in Dane County and everywhere in the city of Madison. But there are many services that are centralized in the central part of Madison, and a building like MARC would require a substantial transportation plan," Hendrick said.