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County, city discuss possible day shelter for homeless

County, city discuss possible day shelter for homeless

Dane County could make a deal on a new permanent day shelter for the homeless in the next couple of weeks.

Officials said the push for finding a place for the homeless is because there are so many people still trying to get on their feet after the recession.

The ideal location would be in the immediate downtown area so the homeless can have quick access to services to help them get jobs and get back on their feet. But as the real estate market bounces back, properties that fit the county's needs and fit into the $600,000 budget have been scarce.

As a result, their focus has turned to properties some distance from the city center, like the MARC East building on Lien Road.

"Part of the answer is that the homeless are everywhere in Dane County and everywhere in the city of Madison. But there are many services that are centralized in the central part of Madison, and a building like MARC would require a substantial transportation plan," Hendrick said.

$24M pavilions to replace Alliant Energy Center's barns

$24M pavilions to replace Alliant Energy Center's barns

Dane County will replace the Alliant Energy Center’s barns with multi-use pavilions in a $24 million project set to begin early next year.

Dane County Executive Joe Parisi said Tuesday that the county will award a Middleton construction company a nearly $20.7 million contract to build the pavilions. 

The project is pending funding approval from the Wisconsin State Building Commission and the Dane County Board of Supervisors.

Middleton-based Miron Construction will build the pavilions that will create 290,000 square feet of multi-use space on the footprint of the Alliant Energy Center’s existing barns, according to a news release from Parisi’s office.

Demolition of the barns is expected to begin next year, with the project’s estimated completion in time for the 2014 World Dairy Expo.

Madison park project goes back to drawing board

Madison park project goes back to drawing board

It's back to the drawing board for those creating a vision for Madison's Public Market.

Mayor Paul Soglin said the project may not be downtown and everything is back on the table. Soglin introduced a new consultant Tuesday who's beginning a new business plan for the proposed park.

Developing a new business plan could take six to eight months.

"We want to find a place for this that fits the vision and the program of uses and activities, and actual elements that will be in the market. We want a place that supports that," said Steve Davies, senior vice president of Project for Public Spaces.

The public will be invited to weigh in on the consultant's review, which is expected to cost $250,000.

DPI announces school-funding numbers

DPI announces school-funding numbers

The Department of Public Instruction released school-funding numbers Tuesday, and 183 districts will see an increase in state aid. Another 239 districts, including the Madison Metropolitan School District, will see a decrease in state aid.

Total aid given to districts has increased by a total of $47.9 million from the last school year bringing the total school funding budget to $4.342 billion, according to a release.

Funding for Madison will drop 14.5 percent compared to last year. The district will get $49.9 million from the state, which is about $9 million less than last year.

Democracy decays with focus on candidate funding, author says

Democracy decays with focus on candidate funding, author says

A local author and national political reporter's newest book discusses campaign funding and the 2012 presidential election.

The book, "Dollarocracy: How the Money and Media Election Complex is Destroying America," written by John Nichols and Robert W. McChesney, was published earlier in June.

Nichols and McChesney both live part-time in Madison.

Nichols said the high-cost campaigns are threatening to make democracy too finance-focused.

 

 

Watch Nichols discuss the book, his theory of “Dollarocracy,” the media election complex and more with News 3 Monday.

56 arts projects, orgs get cut of $91K grants

More than 50 area artists and organizations got a cut of $91,775 in funding earmarked for cultural programs, city representatives said.

At its May 21 meeting, the Madison Common Council approved the recommendations of the Madison Arts Commission to award 56 of Madison's artists and non-profit organizations.

The commission said more than 90 percent of funding applicants received a grant, which MAC chair Leslee Nelson described as seed money.

“Especially for new projects, even a small amount of funding provides an endorsement that groups use to find additional resources required,” Nelson said in a news release.

The projects funded ranged from theatrical productions, dance and ballet programs, musical instruction at various schools, and more.

For a list of the 56 organizations and projects, visit the City of Madison website.

PTO presidents consider education challenges

PTO presidents consider education challenges

Although the school board elections are over, education-related issues still weigh on parents’ minds.

For Suzanne Swift, the president of Franklin-Randall Elementary School’s parent-teacher organization, the issues are the same as they have always been, despite certain ones being used by candidates to "hang their hats on.”